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US Visa
Visitors to the United States must obtain a visa from one of the United States diplomatic missions unless they come from one of the visa exempt countries or Visa Waiver Program countries.

A foreign national wishing to enter the U.S. must obtain a visa unless he or she is

    a citizen of one of the thirty-seven Visa Waiver Program countries,
    a citizen of Canada, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau
    a British Overseas Territories Citizen from Bermuda or the Cayman Islands
    a citizen of the Bahamas or a British Overseas Territories Citizen from the Turks and Caicos Islands (if traveling directly to the U.S. from their respective countries with a valid passport and police certificate issued within six months of time of travel certifying they do not have a serious criminal record)
    eligible for visa-free travel under other laws.

There are separate requirements for Mexican citizens.

While there are about 185 different types of visas, there are two main categories of U.S. visas:

    Nonimmigrant visa - for temporary visits such as for tourism, business, work or studying.
    Immigrant visa - for people to immigrate to the United States. At the port of entry, the immigrant visa holder is processed for a permanent resident card (I-551, a.k.a. green card). Upon endorsement (CBP admission stamp) it serves as temporary I-551 evidencing permanent residence for 1 year.

In order to immigrate, one should either have an immigrant visa or have a dual intent visa, which is one that is compatible with making a concurrent application for permanent resident status, or having an intention to apply for permanent residence.

Entering the U.S. on an employment visa may be described as a three-step process in most cases.First, the employer files an application with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services requesting a particular type of category visa for a specific individual. If the employer’s application is approved, it only authorizes the individual to apply for a visa; the approved application is not actually a visa. The individual then applies for a visa and is usually interviewed at a U.S. embassy or consulate in the native country. ƒIf the embassy or consulate gives the visa, the individual is then allowed to travel to the U.S. At the border crossing, airport, or other point of entry into the U.S., the individual speaks with an officer from U.S. Customs and Border Protection to ask to admission to the U.S. If approved, the individual may then enter the U.S.

List of U.S. nonimmigrant and temporary visas

A foreign national who enters into the United States to invest, work, train, or reside in the United States shall have a visa.  We will help you to define the most suitable visa for you according to the purpose of your trip as well as your academic and professional backgrounds.

There is a visa for each letter of the alphabet as described in the list below.

A-1 Visa:

Foreign Government Officials: Ambassador, Public Minister, Career Diplomat or Consular Officer, or Immediate Family.

A-2 Visa:

Foreign Government Officials: Other Foreign Government Official or Employee, or Immediate Family.

A-3 Visa:

Foreign Government Officials: Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of A-1 or A-2, or Immediate Family.

B-1 Visa:

Temporary Visa for Business Travelers and domestic servant.

B-2 Visa:

Visitors (“tourists”): Temporary Visitor for Pleasure or Medical Treatment.

C-1 Visa:

Alien in Transit.

C-1/D Visa:

Combined Transit and Crewman Visa.

C-2 Visa:

Alien in Transit to United Nations Headquarters District Under Sec. 11.(3), (4), or (5) of the Headquarters Agreement.

C-3 Visa:

Foreign Government Official, Immediate Family, Attendant, Servant or Personal Employee, in Transit.

C-4 Visa:

Transit without Visa, see ATP

D-1 Visa:

Crew member departing on same vessel of arrival.

D-2 Visa:

Crew member departing by means other than vessel of arrival.

E-1 Visa:

Treaty Trader, Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

E2 Visa:

Treaty Investor, Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

E-2 Visa:

Employee Treaty Trader, Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

E-3 Visa:

Special category for Australian nationals who will work in a Specialty Occupation (Profession), Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21). It is called an “Australian H-1B”.

EB-5 Visa:

Green Card for investors of $1 million or $500,000 in a “Pilot Program”.

F-1 Visa:

Academic Student.

F-2 Visa:

Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

G-1 Visa:

Principal Resident Representative of Recognized Foreign Government to International Organization, Staff, or Immediate Family.

G-2 Visa:

Other Representative of Recognized Foreign Member Government to International Organization, or Immediate Family.

G-3 Visa:

Representative of Non recognized Non member Foreign Government to International Organization, or Immediate Family.

G-4 Visa:

International Organization Officer or Employee, or Immediate Family.

G-5 Visa:

Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of G-1 through G-4 or Immediate Family.

H-1B1 Visa:

Professionals who come temporarily to the U.S. to perform a specialty occupation.

H-1B2 Visa:

Aliens who come temporarily to the U.S. to perform cooperative research and development projects.

H-1B3 Visa:

Aliens who come temporarily to the U.S. as a fashion model.

H-1C Visa:

Nurse coming to areas of health professional shortage.

H-2A Visa:

Aliens who come to the U.S. to perform agricultural labor or services of temporary or seasonal nature.

H-2B Visa:

Aliens who come to the U.S. not to perform agricultural labor or services but to perform work in temporary nature.

H-2R Visa:

Special type of H-2B visa which was temporarily provided as a way to bypass the quotas for the H-2B for individuals who had been previously issued H-2B status (enacted in the Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005, P.L. 109-13, 119 Stat. 231, signed into law by the President on May 11, 2005).

H-3 Visa:

Aliens who come to the U.S. to participate in a training program.

H-4 Visa:

Spouses and children under the age of twenty-one (21).

I Visa:

Representative of Foreign Information Media, Spouses and Child.

J-1 Visa:

Exchange Visitor.

J-2 Visa:

Exchange Visitor.

K-1 Visa:

Fiance(e) of United States Citizen.

K-2 Visa:

Minor Child of Fiance(e) of U.S. Citizen.

K-3 Visa:

Spouses of a U.S. Citizen under LIFE Act.

K-4 Visa:

Children of K-3 under LIFE Act.

L-1A Visa:

Intracompany Transferee (Executive, Managerial) Continuing Employment with International Firm or Corporation.

L-1B Visa:

Intracompany Transferee (Specialized Knowledge Personnel) Continuing Employment with International Firm or Corporation.

L-2 Visa:

Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

M-1 Visa:

Vocational Student or Other Nonacademic Student.

M-2 Visa:

Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

N-8 Visa:

Parent of an Alien Classified SK-3 Special Immigrant.

N-9 Visa:

Children under the age of twenty-one (21) of N-8 or of an SK-1, SK-2, or SK-4 Special Immigrant.

NATO-1 Visa:

Principal Permanent Representative of Member State to NATO (including any of its Subsidiary Bodies) Resident in the U.S. and Resident Members of Official Staff; Secretary General, Assistant Secretary General, and Executive Secretary of NATO; Other Permanent NATO Officials of Similar Rank, or Immediate Family.

NATO-2 Visa:

Other Representative of member state to NATO (including any of Subsidiary Bodies) including Representatives, its Advisers and Technical Experts of Delegations, Members of Immediate Art. 3, 4 UST 1796 Family; Dependents of Member of a Force Entering in Accordance with the Provisions Status-of-Forces Agreement or in Accordance with the provisions of the Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters; Members of Such a Force if Issued Visas.

NATO-3 Visa:

Official Clerical Staff Accompanying Representative of Member State to NATO (including any of its Subsidiary Bodies) or Immediate Family.

NATO-4 Visa:

Official of NATO (Other Than Those Classifiable as NATO- 1) or Immediate Family.

NATO-5 Visa:

Expert, Other Than NATO Officials Classifiable Under the NATO-4, Employed in Missions on Behalf of NATO, and their Dependents.

NATO-6 Visa:

Member of a Civilian Component Accompanying a Force Entering in Accordance with the Provisions of the NATO Status-of- Forces Agreement; Member of a Civilian Component Attached to or Employed by an Allied Headquarters Under the Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters Set Up Pursuant to the North Atlantic Treaty; and their Dependents.

NATO-7 Visa:

Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, NATO-5, and NATO-6 Classes, or Immediate Family.

O-1A Visa:

Aliens possessing extraordinary abilities in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics.

O-1B Visa:

Aliens of extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry.

O-2 Visa:

Accompanying Alien.

O-3 Visa:

Spouses or Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

P-1 Visa:

Athletes, Entertainement Groups and Support Personnel.

P-2 Visa:

Artistic Exchange (reciprocical exchange program).

P-3 Visa:

Artistic Exchange (culturally unique program).

P-4 Visa:

Spouses and Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

Q-1 Visa:

Participant in an International Cultural Exchange Program.

Q-2 Visa:

Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program (Walsh Visas).

Q-3 Visa:

Spouses and children under the age of twenty-one (21).

R-1 Visa:

Aliens in a religious occupation.

R-2 Visa:

Spouses or Children under the age of twenty-one (21).

S-5 Visa:

Certain Aliens Supplying Critical Information Relating to a Criminal Organization or Enterprise.

S-6 Visa:

Certain Aliens Supplying Critical Information Relating to Terrorism.

S-7 Visa:

Qualified Family Member of S-5 or S-6.

T-1 Visa:

Victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons.

T-2 Visa:

Spouse of a victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons.

T-3 Visa:

Child of victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons.

T-4 Visa:

Parent of victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons (if T-1 victim if under twenty-one (21) years of age).

TN Visa:

Professional Workers under NAFTA.

TD Visa:

Spouses and children under the age of twenty-one (21).

TWOV Visa:

Transit Without Visa Program (Passenger and Crew) SUSPENDED: this program was SUSPENDED at 11:00 a.m., Saturday August 2, 2003 (EST).

U-1 Visa:

Victim of Certain Criminal Activity.

U-2 Visa:

Spouse of U-1.

U-3 Visa:

Child of U-1.

U-4 Visa:

Parent of U-1, if U-1 is under the age of twenty-one (21).

V-1 Visa:

Spouse of an LPR who is the principal beneficiary of a family-based petition (Form I-130) which was filed prior to December 21, 2000, and has been pending for at least three years.

V-2 Visa:

Child of an LPR who is the principal beneficiary of a family-based visa petition (Form I-130) that was filed prior to December 21, 2000, and has been pending for at least three years.

V-3 Visa:

The derivative children of a V-1 or V-2.

TPS Visa:

Temporary Protected       Status.

Contact us today for professional assistance and guide on how to process your US Visa
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